cultural territorial networks

environmental heritage

 

 

The territory of Bruxelles is constellated and surrounded by a continuous network of Parks and Gardens such as the Laeken Park, the Florist’s Gardens  « Jardins du fleuriste », and the garden cities :  "Logis" and "Floréal".
Laeken Park is a wonderful piece of land that offers a vast space for a stroll in the presence of splendid greenery and water. Established in the 19th Century, the “Florist’s Gardens” are a unique environment that combines the love for nature with a cutting edge urban design project.
At the beginning of the 20th C, the Belgian towns were facing a huge shortage of social dwellings. The town planners decided to build the social housing neighborhoods on the garden city model. The most famous ones are "Logis" and "Floréal".

go to top

 

1.1Park of Laeken

 

The Laeken Park is a wonderful piece of land that offers a vast space for a stroll in the presence of splendid greenery and water. The site is located in a way that allows enjoying both a view on the city and on the imposing Royal Palace of Laeken and includes large lawns and shady groves of magnolias and chestnut trees. The focal point of the Laeken Park is an impressive monument of the Dynasty erected in homage to King Leopold I - the first King of Belgium.

The Park was created in the 19th century by King Leopold II and is situated near the royal estate of Laeken.

The prospect of planning a public park delighted the inhabitants of the bordering neighborhoods who saw in this project a great advantage for their area. The park was designed between 1876 and 1880 - the year of the 50th anniversary of Belgium’s Independence. The King’s memorial also dates from the same year and it was built by the Belgian architect Louis Curt in the axis of the courtyard of the Royalruxelles Palace, “where the King has always lived and where he died”.

go to top

 




1.2 The Florist’s Gardens « Jardins du fleuriste »

 

Established in the 19th Century, the “Florist’s Gardens” are a unique environment that combines the love for nature with a cutting edge urban design project.

The “Florist’s Gardens” were also created by King Leopold II who wished to have a site of near 7 hectares dedicated to horticulture. The site has two terraces - one designed as an ornamental garden by the landscape architect Emile Laine and a second lower terrace with greenhouses to be used as a technical space for the production of flowers and ornamental plants of the royal domain. In time, the site became a space for training and sharing where landscape professionals and amateurs meet and practice the art of gardening.

Parck Design: For three consecutive editions (2006-2007-2008) this project encouraged the creation of contemporary urban furniture that could be integrated in green areas such as parks or public gardens. A number of award-winning items still can be seen in various locations across Brussels. The Florist’s Garden displays several such innovative objects among which Suisse par David Vancanneyt & Olivier Richard, Déjeuner sur l’ombre by the French designers Anika Perez & Brice Genre and Interference by Alexandre Moronnoz.

go to top

 




1.3 The garden cities: "Logis" and "Floréal"

 

At the beginning of the 20th C, the Belgian towns were facing a huge shortage of social dwellings. After consultation with English and Dutch experts, the town planners decided to build the social housing neighborhoods on the garden city model. The most famous ones - "Logis" and "Floréal " - are in Brussels and can still be visited today.

Begun around 1912 by the architects Louis Van der Swaelmen and Jean-Jules Eggericx, this huge residential area provided inexpensive homes, with attractive small two-storey houses interspersed with gardens. They were inspired by the English garden cities and by the “cottage style” of the Dutch social neighborhoods. The specific features of the two cities are preserved until today: the Logis has green woodwork and streets with names of animals, and Floreal has yellow woodwork and streets with names of flowers. Exceptional care has been devoted so far to both the houses and the public spaces.

The district preserved until this day its harmonious and welcoming environment. However, in the present modern society, the inhabitants find it more and more difficult to comply with the strict rules of a listed architectural heritage.

go to top

 




 
Site Map | Printable View | © 2010 - 2020 TECCN | | HTML 5 | CSS